Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts

Community Building, Building Community
Bob Hansman, X10 XCORE 307
This theory course introduces and analyzes interventions that improve quality of life by improving and strengthening neighborhoods as essential components of regional economies. Content covers community development strategies. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Urban Books
Ken Botnick, Zeuler Lima, X10 XCORE 335X
This course critically embraces the artist’s book as an exploration of our experience of large cities. Students develop, design, and produce individual books relating to their experience of the city. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Digital Filmmaking: City Stories
Monika Weiss, X10 XCORE 344
Students in this video art class make short films through trandisciplinary and time-based storytelling in both narrative and non-narrative formats. All projects require a social and urban engagement component, engaging St. Louis and the complex fabric of the city. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Public Practice
Noah Kirby, X10 386X
Through the University City Sculpture Series, WUSTL students work with municipal partners to get approval for and execute public sculpture in University City. Participants gain valuable experience executing on works of public art for temporary installation. Semester: Spring. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Design Process
Gay Lorberbaum, A46 ARCH 209
This course transcends the traditional classroom framework, emphasizing project based learning and real world problem solving. Students will accomplish answering core questions through the process of lateral thinking, in which they consider the key principles of working in cycles, synthesizing many variables, doing research, changing scales of inquiry. A culminating project will enable each student to apply lateral thinking skills to his or her own academic and personal interests.  Semester: Fall. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Community Building II: North
Andrew Raimist, A46 ARCH 308X
This course addresses critical concerns at the intersection of the built and social fabrics, combining research and analysis with direct engagement for meaningful community improvement. Students will work in the North St. Louis neighborhoods around  historic Wellston Loop. Semester: Spring. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Service Learning Course: Environmental Issues
Gay Lorberbaum, A46 ARCH 430A
Students learn the creative process of lateral thinking, developing a set of hands-on problem-solving workshops on environmental issues for middle-school students at Compton-Drew Middle School, ultimately working directly with middle schoolers to deliver these workshops. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credit course.


Urban Ecosystem Principles Integration
Medley, Lazarus, Gaidis A46 ARCH 404E
Students are exposed to lectures from experts from many disciplines, focusing on Healthy Urban Ecosystems principles drawn from ecology, urban design, architecture, and other disciplines. Students research and develop multi-disciplinary applications of these principles.  Semester: Spring. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Segregation by Design: A Historical Analysis of the Impact of Planning and Policy in St. Louis
Catalina Freixas, A46 ARCH 457B
This transdisciplinary seminar, bridging humanities and architecture, introduces students to research, theories, and debates currently being conducted on issues of segregation, urban policy and sustainability. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credits.


NOMA National Design Competition
Charles Brown, A46 ARCH 486A
Students will develop a response to a design challenge in a major metropolitan city in the United States, developing detailed plans and thoughtful solutions to addressing the needs of the people in the surrounding community. Semester: Spring. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Architecture Service Learning Practicum (The Alberti Program)
Gay Lorberbaum, A46 ARCH 488
WUSTL students work with 4th-9th grade students from St. Louis Public Schools to teach them about architecture. They complete hands-on 2D and 3D problem solving projects, use the libraries and computer labs on campus, and are introduced to the field of architecture through lectures and discussions. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 1-2 credits per semester, maximum of 3 allowed.


Explore and Contribute: Collaboration between Washington University and Henry Elementary School
Gay Loberbaum, A46 ARCH 490A
Students develop and teach hands-on problem-solving projects for students from Henry Elementary School, with a focus on ecological sustainability, environmental health, personal responsibility, and leadership to encourage math, science, writing, and hands-on skills. Semester: Spring. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Community Development & American Cities
Hank Webber, A46 ARCH 5079
This theory course introduces and analyzes interventions that improve the quality of life of Americans by improving and strengthening neighborhoods as essential components of regional economies. Content covers community development strategies. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credit course.


Design as a Social Practice: Community Practice in Pagedale
Albie Mitchell, A46 ARCH 563L
This course builds on relationships in Pagedale with the city and Beyond Housing while laying the ground work for new action. In 2014, students developed a pedestrian-focused way-finding campaign aligning with a Great Streets Grant and planned development. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credit course.


Printmaking: Art Practice
Lisa Bulawsky, F10 ART 315H
This course uses the print multiple as a starting point to explore a continuum that runs from propaganda to decoration. The fundamental attributes of the multiple, including its accessibility and repeatability, arc from private to public and from political to aesthetic. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Content to Cover: the Design of Books
Ken Botnick, F10 ART 472B
This studio course considers the design of books in their totality, from the smallest typographic detail, to designing the page grid, and the selection of images, type, materials, and color of the binding and cover. Discussion of print production and binding options in industry will be enhanced by a visit to a local offset printer and to Olin Library Special Collections. Semester: Fall. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Structuring Data for Effective Visualization
Heather Corcoran, Cynthia Traub, F20 ART 435P
A primer on techniques for acquiring and structuring data in preparation for visualization.  Students will develop concrete skills in preparing data for exploratory data analysis, as well as documenting workflows for reproducibility. Semester: Fall. Additional Info: 1 credit.


Special Topics in Communication Design: Design for Social Impact
Penina Acayo, F10 ART 435M
Students learn how to utilize appropriate design research methods and tools to prioritize the needs of the end users and their local contexts. Students conduct design research, analyze data, and discover innovative solutions to community issues while working collaboratively. Semester: Fall. Additional Info: 3 credit.


Radical Design: Making Civic Experiences
Alix Gerber, F20 ART 239I
The economic and political structures that govern us have become largely assumed and unchallenged. This course explores the daily objects, interactions and spaces that make up these large systems (like a police ticket, or the layout of a courtroom), and experiments with how re-designing these elements can help us question the status quo. Semester: Fall. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Interaction Design: Understanding Health and Well-Being
Enrique Von Rohr, F20 ART X36A
This class will engage principles and methods of interaction design within the context of health challenges. Broadly defined, interaction design is the practice of designing products, environments, systems, and services with a focus on behavior and user experience. We will take on an in-depth challenge in the area of health and well-being and work in cross-disciplinary design teams with an external partner organization. Semester: Fall. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Developing Sustainable Urban Communities
Hank Webber, S60 SWCD 5078
Students work in interdisciplinary project teams on a place-based urban redevelopment challenge in the St. Louis region, collaborating with a community partner and faculty guide through research, case studies, engagement, and project development. Semester: Spring. Additional Info: 3 credits.


Urban Development Seminar
Charles Brown/Barb Levin, A49 MUD 564A
The Urban Issues Symposium is an interdisciplinary course open to students in architecture, law, business, urban design, social work, public health and public policy. Students and faculty from Washington University and Saint Louis University work in interdisciplinary teams to respond to projects in collaboration with local partners in the St. Louis region. During class, faculty members and subject experts present on multi-disciplinary aspects of development projects to help guide the work of class teams. Successful project deliverables require a holistic understanding of and engagement with the community, private property owners, various government agencies (e.g. streets and bikeways, economic development, planning design and use, housing), businesses, schools, and other relevant organizations and individuals. Components of the team response might include community participation, tax credit financing and other subsidies, collaborative planning, social capital building, design, land use, social services, environmental issues, and public-private partnerships. Interdisciplinary student teams are expected to meet regularly outside of class to discuss and prepare their team deliverable. In previous years, collaborative teams have tackled relevant challenges associated with developing and sustaining trail systems within the urban fabric of St. Louis as well as developing conceptual comprehensive strategic plans for the Spanish Lake community. In the upcoming Fall, the faculty will offer another case specific urban issue for the student teams to address, and ultimately submitting group solutions to stakeholders. For any additional information, please contact Barbara Levin at blevin@wustl.edu. This course fulfills the Urban Issues or MUD Track elective requirement. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credits. Course meets at Saint Louis University for the first half of the semester and meets at Washington university for the second half of the semester.


Sustainability Exchange: Community and University Practicums
Bill Lowry, Raymond Ehrhard, Phillip Valko, Hannath Roth, Scott Krummenacher, I50-405/L82-405 150 INTER D 405
Students work in trans-disciplinary teams to tackle real energy, environmental, and sustainability problems guided by faculty advisors, working with on- and off-campus clients. A concurrent seminar explores design thinking as a mode of creative problem-solving. Semester: Fall. Prerequisite: None. Additional Info: 3 credits.